Hello, and welcome to South Carolina Natural Resources, a blog created and maintained by the staff of the S.C. Department of Natural Resource’s Office of Media and Outreach.

Over the coming months, we hope to bring to our readers a lively daily discussion on topics related to natural resources conservation, hunting and fishing, outdoor recreation and tourism, SCDNR projects and initiatives, and other news and information that will be of value to our state’s sporting and conservation communities. It’s just one more way the SCDNR is working to fulfill its mission as the primary steward of and advocate for our state’s amazing natural resources.

Whether you are lucky enough to be a Sandlapper by birth, or are one of the many thousands of folks who have “voted with their feet” to make South Carolina their adopted home, you know without a doubt that this is one special place. With the responsibility for managing more than 1 million acres of wild public lands (and counting), the SCDNR has a huge responsibility to the present and future citizens of this state. And we know that it is the sportsmen and women, the hunters and anglers, and the other individuals who love spending time in the outdoors, who make wildlife and natural resources in this state and in the United States work. Without the funding provided through hunting and fishing licenses and permits and the excise taxes paid on outdoor sporting goods equipment, firearms and ammunition, as well as the working partnerships with landowners and sportsman’s groups, our amazing conservation efforts would be a fraction of what they are today. So for that we say, “thanks,” and please come back and visit often to find out what your state Department of Natural Resources and the larger outdoor community in South Carolina are up to.  We value your input, so if you have ideas for topics you’d like to see covered here, please contact site administrator David Lucas at lucasd@dnr.sc.gov. We look forward to hearing from you.

To paddle…. perchance to dream

To paddle…. perchance to dream

In which an overweight editor finds his Kayak groove...

Practicing my turning stroke on Wimbee Creek. photo by Nancy Stills, Sun City Hilton Head Kayak Club

Practicing my turning stroke on Wimbee Creek.
photo by Nancy Stills, Sun City Hilton Head Kayak Club

I moved to the South Carolina Lowcountry approximately a year ago, a pretty big change from the previous 15 or so years spent in the Midlands of the state, most of that time as the editor of South Carolina Wildlife magazine.  Being editor of SCW was a wonderful job, with just one exception.  You might assume that the editor of a magazine covering wildlife and the outdoors would be constantly in the field, having lots of adventures, but in fact, the opposite is true.  Editing a magazine is a more-than full-time job, and most of that time is spent indoors, squinting at a computer screen, working over story manuscripts and looking through endless photos.  There were a few opportunities to get outdoors for photo shoots and the like, but overall, it’s a sedentary job, and after eight years, I’m here to tell you, my waistline was showing it.

Helping load the boats (note unflattering waistline - aka the editorial bulge). photo by Nancy Stills, Sun City Hilton Head Kayak Club

Helping load the boats (note unflattering waistline - aka the editorial bulge).
photo by Nancy Stills, Sun City Hilton Head Kayak Club

But I’m turning over a new leaf down here in the Lowcountry, in this beautiful place, surrounded by water, and friends, that leaf is going to involve a kayak. I need to lose 25 or so pounds (like a lot of us – you know who you are), but what I desire is to glide through the edges of the saltmarsh, elegantly, like the folks I see here on local rivers, eating up the miles with a smile on my face. I want to learn the ropes of kayaks, the skills and techniques of masters, so that one day I might launch my own, free to explore the creeks and saltmarshes and inland waters and maybe...just maybe…catch a fish. For dinner (grilled, not fried, my chubby friends).

I got a little help with that quest recently, from some members of the Sun City Hilton Head Kayakers Club.  These are not your stereotypical retired folks, this I will tell you. As a quick glance through the trip pictures on their Facebook page shows, they are an active, engaged and pretty darn physically fit bunch, who know how to have a good time on the water. Just the kind of people I need to get to know! So when club VP Nancy Stills contacted me saying they’d really like to have someone from the SCDNR’s Office of Media & Outreach to come and speak to a meeting, the answer was of course, yes. And having learned from my boss that I was a novice yet eager-to-learn paddler, the invitation to speak was quickly followed up by another i to come along on an outing with them and get some basic instruction.

Members of the Sun City Hilton Head Kayakers Club on Briars Creek.

Members of the Sun City Hilton Head Kayakers Club on Briars Creek.

Needless to say, I jumped at the chance, and last week met the group near Dale for a morning paddle on a splendid spot at the top of St. Helena Sound, Wimbee Creek.  I already knew a little about “the Wimbee” – both the creek and the vast salt marsh area surrounding it – thanks to the Roger Pinkney’s recollections of the place in an essay he penned for SCW a few years back in our special “First Light” Issue (January-February 2012). Parts of that essay were incorporated into Roger’s novel, "The Mullet Manifesto” (which I never miss a chance to plug – no bookshelf of great South Carolina literature is complete without it, and you’re welcome in advance).

Salt marsh and Islands in "the Wimbee."

Salt marsh and Islands in "the Wimbee."

Anyway, needless to say, I was eager to finally be able to get on the water there. (The Wimbee Creek Landing features a nice boat ramp and a fishing pier that was part of an old Southern Railroad trestle where the tracks once crossed the creek.  Immediately to the left of the landing (if you’re looking across towards North Williman Island and the Hollings National Wildlife Refuge, is a small slough known as Briars Creek, wide enough at high tide for a fairly large group of paddlers to spend a morning exploring, and calm and flat enough to be the perfect location for me to soak up some basic kayaking basics from some very experienced paddlers.

I met my crew at the landing well after the tide had turned. Club Secretary and trip leader Bill Dickinson was nice enough to loan me a kayak to use AND to give me some great tips about getting in and out of the boat safely and other basics, and Nancy Stills helped me refine my technique of the basic strokes needed to make the kayak go (sort of) where I wanted it to.

Kayaking 101

Clothes and gear:  Apart from your boat and paddle, the number one a must have item when paddling is a wearable, coast-guard approved PFD that fits you well. Kayaks are fairly stable craft (some designs moreso than others) but all can be turned over if you try hard enough.  Getting back in a kayak is a learned skill, and it ain’t easy. If you go over near an oyster rake or in deep water, pulling it to shore to get back in isn’t always an option.  Even if you’re a strong swimmer, the buoyancy afforded by a PFD makes getting back in the boat in open water a LOT easier.  Bottom line – it could save your life. You’ll also want a whistle somewhere handy.  It may feel silly, but if you get in trouble or need to signal an oncoming boat, a good whistle can make a heck of a lot more noise than you can on your own. It’s also the law.

I burn easily, so in addition to a generous coating of waterproof SPF 100 on my face and back of my hands, I like to wear a long-sleeved t-shirt while on the water, and those modern, lightweight nylon “fishing” shirts are just the ticket.  While good old cotton works just fine for sun protection, it won’t dry out nearly as fast if – make that when – it gets wet, and that can get uncomfortable on a long paddle.

When paddling around shell rakes or rocky bottoms, shoes are also a good idea – sport sandals or something else that’s lightweight and drains well. In this part of the world, I’d add bug spray and a lightweight nylon neck gaiter to your kit.  A gaiter can also provide good sun protection and wearing one can actually help lower your skin temperature. It’s also a welcome barrier against the clouds of no-see-ums that populate the ACE Basin this time of the year. 

Life jackets and whistles are a necessity on the water. And while that neck gaiter might make you look like John Dillinger or the invisible man, you'll be glad to have it when the non-see-ums are out in force.

Life jackets and whistles are a necessity on the water. And while that neck gaiter might make you look like John Dillinger or the invisible man, you'll be glad to have it when the non-see-ums are out in force.

When it was time to get in the water, Bill Dickinson walked me through the right way to get in a kayak in a rocky area or one with a steep drop off without scraping up the bottom of your boat. With the kayak parallel to the shore and floating freely, place one hand on either gunwale and slide one leg in first.  Then sit your butt down firmly in the seat before raising your other leg into the cockpit.  It takes a little getting used to, but this technique is actually very easy, particularly if you have a partner to hold your boat in place. If you’re by yourself, it can be accomplished by using your paddle as a sort of outrigger to hold you steady.

Club member Bill Dickinson demonsttrates the right way to enter and exit a kayak. photo by Nancy Stills, Sun City Hilton Head Kayak Club

Club member Bill Dickinson demonsttrates the right way to enter and exit a kayak.
photo by Nancy Stills, Sun City Hilton Head Kayak Club

One by one, our large group of paddlers pushed off and made their way into the creek. With the tide running in, the paddling was fairly easy, and this gave Nancy Stills some time to help me hone my paddling technique and show me the basic strokes needed for turning the boat sharply and backing up.  Fairly intuitive, and not so different from the canoe strokes I’m more familiar with, but it’s great to have someone with experience who can watch what you’re doing and give you some pointers.

With some help and pointers from Nancy Stills, soon I was paddling like a pro (OK, like a guy not necessarily on his first kayak trip).

With some help and pointers from Nancy Stills, soon I was paddling like a pro (OK, like a guy not necessarily on his first kayak trip).

The main thing to remember about paddling a kayak (after making sure the blades of your paddle are facing the right way) is to sit up straight in the seat, keep your arms extended fairly straight and to use “torso rotation” to extend the paddle on first one side and then the other, pulling from front to back and letting the blade come out near your hips.  Don’t make the mistake of “rowing” the paddle using your arms – it’s very inefficient.  Your trunk muscles are much stronger than your arms, and using proper form will allow you to paddle farther, faster and with much less fatigue. Another upside to this is that it’s a great workout for those core muscles involved. In fact, for a certain somewhat overweight magazine-editor-turned-outdoor-blogger who loathes the gym, is bored by running and isn’t masochistic enough for crossfit, but who’s nonetheless looking to drop a few pounds and regain some lost strength and flexibility, it’s kind of the perfect exercise.

Hold the paddle with hands shoulder-width apart.

Hold the paddle with hands shoulder-width apart.

So the fitness angle is great, but in truth, they had me at “on the water.” There’s simply nothing like being surrounded by the saltmarsh, at eye level with the spartina grass, with herons and egrets attending their fishing chores around every bend.  You can’t get this view of things from a 16-foot power skiff. And speaking of fishing, maybe if I keep developing these skills, I’m hoping my next step will involve kayak fishing! It’s good to have a dream, and mine involves a sit-on-top kayak, a lightweight bait-casting setup and a big red drum.  I know it’s out there somewhere with my name on it. That’ll make a great future installment for the S.C. Natural Resources Blog, so keep reading.

 

Turkeys Be Ready . . .

Turkeys Be Ready . . .

A bell by any other name…is still a beautiful wildflower!

A bell by any other name…is still a beautiful wildflower!